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  • Quedlinburg Harz
  • Quedlinburg Harz
  • Quedlinburg Harz
  • Quedlinburg Harz

Quedlinburg


Quedlinburg once a centre of the German Empire is one of Europe's best preserved medieval renaissance towns. It features a rare combination of ancient and modern historical treasures. In 1992 it was placed on the UNESCO World Heritage list. Almost all of the buildings in the town centre are timber framed, some dating back to the 16th century.

Luckily Quedlinburg did not suffer too much damage during WW2 and the DDR authorities quickly recognised it of great national interest and put preservation orders on 1600 timber framed houses. It is a pleasure to walk through the narrow alleys and streets around the town square and to see all the colourful painted old houses richly decorated with flower boxes. In the innermost parts of the town a wide selection of timber framed buildings from at least five different centuries are to be found, including a 14th century structure one of Germany's oldest.

In 2006 an extension of the Harz narrow gauge railway was completed, making it easy to reach the higher plateaus of the Harz Mountains. A tour of the town can begin by the Town hall (Rathouse) which was built in 1320. Outside the Rathouse is the Roland stature (1426) which dates the year that Quedlinburg joined the Hanseatic League. A trip to the Lyonel-Feininger Galerie is recommended where the works of this important Bauhaus artist who was born in Germany but became an American citizen are displayed. Most of the works were hidden from the Nazis by a resident of Quedlinburg.

Off course a highlight of Quedlinburg is the castle (schlossberg) perched above the city, which the centre piece being the recently restored Baroque Blue Hall. If you wish to learn more about the timber framed buildings of the region a trip to the Fachwerkmuseum Standebau in one of Germanys oldest half timbered houses (1310) will be a must.

Places of Interest